Summary of a variable is important to have an idea about the data. Although, summarizing a variable by group gives better information on the distribution of the data.

In this tutorial, you will learn how summarize a dataset by group with the dplyr library.

In this tutorial, you will learn

For this tutorial, you will use the batting dataset. The original dataset contains 102816 observations and 22 variables. You will only use 20 percent of this dataset and use the following variables:

  • playerID: Player ID code. Factor
  • yearID: Year. Factor
  • teamID: Team. factor
  • lgID: League. Factor: AA AL FL NL PL UA
  • AB: At bats. Numeric
  • G: Games: number of games by a player. Numeric
  • R: Runs. Numeric
  • HR: Homeruns. Numeric
  • SH: Sacrifice hits. Numeric

Before you perform summary, you will do the following steps to prepare the data:

  • Step 1: Import the data
  • Step 2: Select the relevant variables
  • Step 3: Sort the data
library(dplyr)

# Step 1
data <- read.csv("https://raw.githubusercontent.com/guru99-edu/R-Programming/master/lahman-batting.csv") % > %

# Step 2
select(c(playerID, yearID, AB, teamID, lgID, G, R, HR, SH))  % > % 

# Step 3
arrange(playerID, teamID, yearID)

A good practice when you import a dataset is to use the glimpse() function to have an idea about the structure of the dataset.

# Structure of the data
glimpse(data)

Output:

Observations: 104,324
Variables: 9
$ playerID <fctr> aardsda01, aardsda01, aardsda01, aardsda01, aardsda01, a...
$ yearID   <int> 2015, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2012, 2013, 2009, 2010, 2004, 196...
$ AB       <int> 1, 1, 0, 2, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 603, 600, 606, 547, 516, 495, ...
$ teamID   <fctr> ATL, BOS, CHA, CHN, NYA, NYN, SEA, SEA, SFN, ATL, ATL, A...
$ lgID     <fctr> NL, AL, AL, NL, AL, NL, AL, AL, NL, NL, NL, NL, NL, NL, ...
$ G        <int> 33, 47, 25, 45, 1, 43, 73, 53, 11, 158, 155, 160, 147, 15...
$ R        <int> 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 117, 113, 84, 100, 103, 95, 75...
$ HR       <int> 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 44, 39, 29, 44, 38, 47, 34, 40...
$ SH       <int> 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 6, ...

Summarise()

The syntax of summarise() is basic and consistent with the other verbs included in the dplyr library.

summarise(df, variable_name=condition) 
arguments: 
- `df`: Dataset used to construct the summary statistics 
- `variable_name=condition`: Formula to create the new variable

Look at the code below:

summarise(data, mean_run =mean(R))

Code Explanation

  • summarise(data, mean_run = mean(R)): Creates a variable named mean_run which is the average of the column run from the dataset data.

Output:

##   mean_run
## 1 19.20114

You can add as many variables as you want. You return the average games played and the average sacrifice hits.

summarise(data, mean_games = mean(G),
    mean_SH = mean(SH, na.rm = TRUE))

Code Explanation

  • mean_SH = mean(SH, na.rm = TRUE): Summarize a second variable. You set na.rm = TRUE because the column SH contains missing observations.

Output:

##   mean_games  mean_SH
## 1   51.98361 2.340085	

Group_by vs no group_by

The function summerise() without group_by() does not make any sense. It creates summary statistic by group. The library dplyr applies a function automatically to the group you passed inside the verb group_by.

Note that, group_by works perfectly with all the other verbs (i.e. mutate(), filter(), arrange(), ...).

It is convenient to use the pipeline operator when you have more than one step. You can compute the average homerun by baseball league.

data % > %
	group_by(lgID) % > %
	summarise(mean_run = mean(HR))

Code Explanation

  • data: Dataset used to construct the summary statistics
  • group_by(lgID): Compute the summary by grouping the variable `lgID
  • summarise(mean_run = mean(HR)): Compute the average homerun

Output:

## 
# A tibble: 7 x 2
##     lgID  mean_run
##   <fctr>     <dbl>
## 1     AA 0.9166667
## 2     AL 3.1270988
## 3     FL 1.3131313
## 4     NL 2.8595953
## 5     PL 2.5789474
## 6     UA 0.6216216
## 7   <NA> 0.2867133	

The pipe operator works with ggplot() as well. You can easily show the summary statistic with a graph. All the steps are pushed inside the pipeline until the grap is plot. It seems more visual to see the average homerun by league with a bar char. The code below demonstrates the power of combining group_by(), summarise() and ggplot() together.

You will do the following step:

  • Step 1: Select data frame
  • Step 2: Group data
  • Step 3: Summarize the data
  • Step 4: Plot the summary statistics
library(ggplot2)
# Step 1
data % > % 
#Step 2
group_by(lgID) % > % 
#Step 3
summarise(mean_home_run = mean(HR)) % > % 
#Step 4
ggplot(aes(x = lgID, y = mean_home_run, fill = lgID)) +
    geom_bar(stat = "identity") +
    theme_classic() +
    labs(
        x = "baseball league",
        y = "Average home run",
        title = paste(
            "Example group_by() with summarise()"
        )
    )

Output:

Function in summarise()

The verb summarise() is compatible with almost all the functions in R. Here is a short list of useful functions you can use together with summarise():

Objective Function Description
Basic mean() Average of vector x

median() Median of vector x

sum() Sum of vector x
variation sd() standard deviation of vector x

IQR() Interquartile of vector x
Range min() Minimum of vector x

max() Maximum of vector x

quantile() Quantile of vector x
Position first() Use with group_by() First observation of the group

last() Use with group_by(). Last observation of the group

nth() Use with group_by(). nth observation of the group
Count n() Use with group_by(). Count the number of rows

n_distinct() Use with group_by(). Count the number of distinct observations

We will see examples for every functions of table 1.

Basic function

In the previous example, you didn't store the summary statistic in a data frame.

You can proceed in two steps to generate a date frame from a summary:

  • Step 1: Store the data frame for further use
  • Step 2: Use the dataset to create a line plot

Step 1) You compute the average number of games played by year.

## Mean
ex1 <- data % > %
	group_by(yearID) % > %
	summarise(mean_game_year = mean(G))
head(ex1)

Code Explanation

  • The summary statistic of batting dataset is stored in the data frame ex1.

Output:

## # A tibble: 6 x 2
##   yearID mean_game_year
##    <int>          <dbl>
## 1   1871       23.42308
## 2   1872       18.37931
## 3   1873       25.61538
## 4   1874       39.05263
## 5   1875       28.39535
## 6   1876       35.90625	

Step 2) You show the summary statistic with a line plot and see the trend.

# Plot the graph
ggplot(ex1, aes(x = yearID, y = mean_game_year)) +
    geom_line() +
    theme_classic() +
    labs(
        x = "Year",
        y = "Average games played",
        title = paste(
            "Average games played from 1871 to 2016"
        )
    )

Output:

Subsetting

The function summarise() is compatible with subsetting.

## Subsetting + Median
data % > %
group_by(lgID) % > %
summarise(median_at_bat_league = median(AB), 
	#Compute the median without the zero 
	median_at_bat_league_no_zero = median(AB[AB > 0]))

Code Explanation

  • median_at_bat_league_no_zero = median(AB[AB > 0]): The variable AB contains lots of 0. You can compare the median of the at bat variable with and without 0.

Output:

## # A tibble: 7 x 3
##     lgID median_at_bat_league median_at_bat_league_no_zero
##   <fctr>                <dbl>                        <dbl>
## 1     AA                  130                          131
## 2     AL                   38                           85
## 3     FL                   88                           97
## 4     NL                   56                           67
## 5     PL                  238                          238
## 6     UA                   35                           35
## 7   <NA>                  101                          101	

Sum

Another useful function to aggregate the variable is sum().

You can check which leagues have the more homeruns.

## Sum
data % > %
	group_by(lgID) % > %
	summarise(sum_homerun_league = sum(HR))

Output:

## # A tibble: 7 x 2
##     lgID sum_homerun_league
##   <fctr>              <int>
## 1     AA                341
## 2     AL              29426
## 3     FL                130
## 4     NL              29817
## 5     PL                 98
## 6     UA                 46
## 7   <NA>                 41	

Standard deviation

Spread in the data is computed with the standard deviation or sd() in R.

# Spread
data % > %
	group_by(teamID) % > %
	summarise(sd_at_bat_league = sd(HR))

Output:

## # A tibble: 148 x 2
##    teamID sd_at_bat_league
##    <fctr>            <dbl>
##  1    ALT               NA
##  2    ANA        8.7816395
##  3    ARI        6.0765503
##  4    ATL        8.5363863
##  5    BAL        7.7350173
##  6    BFN        1.3645163
##  7    BFP        0.4472136
##  8    BL1        0.6992059
##  9    BL2        1.7106757
## 10    BL3        1.0000000
## # ... with 138 more rows		

There are lots of inequality in the quantity of homerun done by each team.

Minimum and maximum

You can access the minimum and the maximum of a vector with the function min() and max().

The code below returns the lowest and highest number of games in a season played by a player.

# Min and max
data % > %
	group_by(playerID) % > %
	summarise(min_G = min(G),
    max_G = max(G))

Output:

## # A tibble: 10,395 x 3
##     playerID min_G max_G
##       <fctr>       <int>
##  1 aardsda01    53    73
##  2 aaronha01   120   156
##  3  aasedo01    24    66
##  4  abadfe01    18    18
##  5 abadijo01    11    11
##  6 abbated01     3   153
##  7 abbeybe01    11    11
##  8 abbeych01    80   132
##  9 abbotgl01     5    23
## 10 abbotji01    13    29
## # ... with 10,385 more rows

Count

Count observations by group is always a good idea. With R, you can aggregate the the number of occurence with n().

For instance, the code below computes the number of years played by each player.

# count observations
data % > %
	group_by(playerID) % > %
	summarise(number_year = n()) % > %
	arrange(desc(number_year))

Output:

## # A tibble: 10,395 x 2
##     playerID number_year
##       <fctr>       <int>
##  1 pennohe01          11
##  2 joosted01          10
##  3 mcguide01          10
##  4  rosepe01          10
##  5 davisha01           9
##  6 johnssi01           9
##  7  kaatji01           9
##  8 keelewi01           9
##  9 marshmi01           9
## 10 quirkja01           9
## # ... with 10,385 more rows

First and last

You can select the first, last or nth position of a group.

For instance, you can find the first and last year of each player.

# first and last
data % > %
	group_by(playerID) % > %
	summarise(first_appearance = first(yearID),
		last_appearance = last(yearID))

Output:

## # A tibble: 10,395 x 3
##     playerID first_appearance last_appearance
##       <fctr>            <int>           <int>
##  1 aardsda01             2009            2010
##  2 aaronha01             1973            1975
##  3  aasedo01             1986            1990
##  4  abadfe01             2016            2016
##  5 abadijo01             1875            1875
##  6 abbated01             1905            1897
##  7 abbeybe01             1894            1894
##  8 abbeych01             1895            1897
##  9 abbotgl01             1973            1979
## 10 abbotji01             1992            1996
## # ... with 10,385 more rows

nth observation

The fonction nth() is complementary to first() and last(). You can access the nth observation within a group with the index to return.

For instance, you can filter only the second year that a team played.

# nth
data % > %
	group_by(teamID) % > %
	summarise(second_game = nth(yearID, 2)) % > %
	arrange(second_game)

Output:

## # A tibble: 148 x 2
##    teamID second_game
##    <fctr>       <int>
##  1    BS1        1871
##  2    CH1        1871
##  3    FW1        1871
##  4    NY2        1871
##  5    RC1        1871
##  6    BR1        1872
##  7    BR2        1872
##  8    CL1        1872
##  9    MID        1872
## 10    TRO        1872
## # ... with 138 more rows

Distinct number of observation

The function n() returns the number of observations in a current group. A closed function to n() is n_distinct(), which count the number of unique values.

In the next example, you add up the total of players a team recruited during the all periods.

# distinct values
data % > %
	group_by(teamID) % > %
	summarise(number_player = n_distinct(playerID)) % > %
	arrange(desc(number_player))

Code Explanation

  • group_by(teamID): Group by year and team
  • summarise(number_player = n_distinct(playerID)): Count the distinct number of players by team
  • arrange(desc(number_player)): Sort the data by the number of player

Output:

## # A tibble: 148 x 2
##    teamID number_player
##    <fctr>         <int>
##  1    CHN           751
##  2    SLN           729
##  3    PHI           699
##  4    PIT           683
##  5    CIN           679
##  6    BOS           647
##  7    CLE           646
##  8    CHA           636
##  9    DET           623
## 10    NYA           612
## # ... with 138 more rows

Multiple groups

A summary statistic can be realized among multiple groups.

# Multiple groups
data % > %
	group_by(yearID, teamID) % > %
	summarise(mean_games = mean(G)) % > %
	arrange(desc(teamID, yearID))

Code Explanation

  • group_by(yearID, teamID): Group by year and team
  • summarise(mean_games = mean(G)): Summarize the number of game player
  • arrange(desc(teamID, yearID)): Sort the data by team and year

Output:

## # A tibble: 2,829 x 3
## # Groups:   yearID [146]
##    yearID teamID mean_games
##     <int> <fctr>      <dbl>
##  1   1884    WSU   20.41667
##  2   1891    WS9   46.33333
##  3   1886    WS8   22.00000
##  4   1887    WS8   51.00000
##  5   1888    WS8   27.00000
##  6   1889    WS8   52.42857
##  7   1884    WS7    8.00000
##  8   1875    WS6   14.80000
##  9   1873    WS5   16.62500
## 10   1872    WS4    4.20000
## # ... with 2,819 more rows 

Filter

Before you intend to do an operation, you can filter the dataset. The dataset starts in 1871, and the analysis does not need the years prior to 1980.

# Filter
data % > %
	filter(yearID > 1980) % > %
	group_by(yearID) % > %
	summarise(mean_game_year = mean(G))

Code Explanation

  • filter(yearID > 1980): Filter the data to show only the relevant years (i.e. after 1980)
  • group_by(yearID): Group by year
  • summarise(mean_game_year = mean(G)): Summarize the data

Output:

## # A tibble: 36 x 2
##    yearID mean_game_year
##     <int>          <dbl>
##  1   1981       40.64583
##  2   1982       56.97790
##  3   1983       60.25128
##  4   1984       62.97436
##  5   1985       57.82828
##  6   1986       58.55340
##  7   1987       48.74752
##  8   1988       52.57282
##  9   1989       58.16425
## 10   1990       52.91556
## # ... with 26 more rows

Ungroup

Last but not least, you need to remove the grouping before you want to change the level of the computation.

# Ungroup the data
data % > %
	filter(HR > 0) % > %
	group_by(playerID) % > %
	summarise(average_HR_game = sum(HR) / sum(G)) % > %
	ungroup() % > %
	summarise(total_average_homerun = mean(average_HR_game))

Code Explanation

  • filter(HR >0) : Exclude zero homerun
  • group_by(playerID): group by player
  • summarise(average_HR_game = sum(HR)/sum(G)): Compute average homerun by player
  • ungroup(): remove the grouping
  • summarise(total_average_homerun = mean(average_HR_game)): Summarize the data

Output:

## # A tibble: 1 x 1
##   total_average_homerun
##                   <dbl>
## 1            0.06882226	

Summary

When you want to return a summary by group, you can use:

# group by X1, X2, X3
group(df, X1, X2, X3)		

you need to ungroup the data with:

ungroup(df)	

The table below summarizes the function you learnt with summarise()

method

function

code

mean

mean

summarise(df,mean_x1 = mean(x1))

median

median

summarise(df,median_x1 = median(x1))

sum

sum

summarise(df,sum_x1 = sum(x1))

standard deviation

sd

summarise(df,sd_x1 = sd(x1))

interquartile

IQR

summarise(df,interquartile_x1 = IQR(x1))

minimum

min

summarise(df,minimum_x1 = min(x1))

maximum

max

summarise(df,maximum_x1 = max(x1))

quantile

quantile

summarise(df,quantile_x1 = quantile(x1))

first observation

first

summarise(df,first_x1 = first(x1))

last observation

last

summarise(df,last_x1 = last(x1))

nth observation

nth

summarise(df,nth_x1 = nth(x1, 2))

number of occurrence

n

summarise(df,n_x1 = n(x1))

number of distinct occurrence

n_distinct

summarise(df,n_distinct _x1 = n_distinct(x1))

 

YOU MIGHT LIKE: