TestNG is a Testing framework, that covers different types of test designs like a unit test, functional test, end to end test, UI test and integration test.

You can run a single or multiple test cases in your Testng code.

If test priority is not defined while, running multiple test cases, TestNG assigns all @Test a priority as zero(0).

Now, while running; lower priorities will be scheduled first.

Demo of TestNG code without Priority

Let's take a scenario where sequencing will be required in order to pass all test cases:

Scenario: Generate a code where you are required to perform a Google search with a specific keyword say "Facebook". Now, verify that Browser title is changed to "Facebook - Google Search".

Note: Each step which you code should be in separate methods

Method 1: Open Browser say Firefox (openBrowser())

Method 2: Launch Google.com (launchGoogle())

Method 3: Perform a search using "Facebook" (performSearchAndClick1stLink())

Method 4: Verify Google search page title (FaceBookPageTitleVerification())

Code for our scenario:

import org.openqa.selenium.By;			
import org.openqa.selenium.WebDriver;			
import org.openqa.selenium.firefox.FirefoxDriver;			
import org.testng.Assert;			
import org.testng.annotations.Test;			

public class Priority_In_testNG {		
    WebDriver driver;			

	    // Method 1: Open Brower say Firefox			
	    @Test		
	    public void openBrowser() {				
	        driver = new FirefoxDriver();				
	    }		

	    // Method 2: Launch Google.com			
	    @Test		
	    public void launchGoogle() {				
	        driver.get("http://www.google.co.in");						
	    }		
        
	    // Method 3: Perform a search using "Facebook"			
	    @Test		
	    public void peformSeachAndClick1stLink() {				
	        driver.findElement(By.xpath(".//*[@title='Search']")).sendKeys("Facebook");								
	    }		

	    // Method 4: Verify Google search page title.			
	    @Test		
	    public void FaceBookPageTitleVerification() throws Exception {				
	        driver.findElement(By.xpath(".//*[@value='Search']")).click();						
	        Thread.sleep(3000);		
	        Assert.assertEquals(driver.getTitle().contains("Facebook - Google Search"), true);				
	    }		
	}		

Explanation of Code

As mentioned above we have created 4 test cases for performing each action in an independent methods.

  • The first method (openBrowser) states to initialize Firefox browser.
  • The second method (launchGoogle) states that launch Google.com is in the initialized browser.
  • The third method (peformSeachAndClick1stLink)states that perform a search in the search box (with xpath (".//*[@title='Search']") with a search term as Facebook and
  • The fourth and last method (FaceBookPageTitleVerification) states that click on search icon of Google and verify that browser title has been changed to Facebook - Google Search.

Now run this code using testNG as shown in the video you will find all the Test Case are failing. The reason for failure: as there is a dependency of previous test case to pass, only than current running test case will be passed.

In this case,

  • First method which is executed is openBrowser(). It got passed because it does not have any dependency.
  • Second method executed is FaceBookPageTitleVerification(); it is failing because we are trying to click search button and verifying browser title.
  • You can see that if search activity is not process then how any other step can get passed. Hence, this is the reason my test cases are failing.

PASSED: openBrowser

FAILED: FaceBookPageTitleVerification

FAILED: launchGoogle

FAILED: peformSeachAndClick1stLink

If we don’t mention any priority, testng will execute the @Test methods based on alphabetical order of their method names irrespective of their place of implementation in the code.

package com.guru.testngannotations;

import org.testng.annotations.Test;

public class TestNG_Priority_Annotations {

@Test
public void c_method(){
System.out.println("I'm in method C");
}
@Test
public void b_method(){
System.out.println("I'm in method B");
}
@Test
public void a_method(){
System.out.println("I'm in method A");
}
@Test
public void e_method(){
System.out.println("I'm in method E");
}
@Test
public void d_method(){
System.out.println("I'm in method D");
}

}

Output

I'm in method A 
I'm in method B 
I'm in method C 
I'm in method D 
I'm in method E 

Though we defined the methods in a random manner (c, b, a, e, d), testng executed the methods based on their method names by considering alphabetical order and the same was reflected in the output as well.

Importance of Priority in running testNG methods

As you have seen in the previous example that sequencing required in order to pass this scenario, so we will be modifying the previous piece of code with Priority Parameter so that each test should run against to the priority assigned to them.

Now as you can see we have assigned the Priority to each test case means test case will the lower priority value will be executed first.

Priority in testNG in action

import org.openqa.selenium.By;			
import org.openqa.selenium.WebDriver;			
import org.openqa.selenium.firefox.FirefoxDriver;			
import org.testng.Assert;			
import org.testng.annotations.Test;			

public class Priority_In_testNG {		
    WebDriver driver;			

    // Method 1: Open Browser say Firefox			
    @Test (priority=1)		
    public void openBrowser() {				
        driver = new FirefoxDriver();				
    }		

    // Method 2: Launch Google.com			
    @Test (priority=2)		
    public void launchGoogle() {				
        driver.get("http://www.google.co.in");						
    }		

    // Method 3: Perform a search using "Facebook"			
    @Test (priority=3)		
    public void peformSeachAndClick1stLink() {				
        driver.findElement(By.xpath(".//*[@title='Search']")).sendKeys("Facebook");								
    }		

    // Method 4: Verify Google search page title.			
    @Test (priority=4)		
    public void FaceBookPageTitleVerification() throws Exception {				
        driver.findElement(By.xpath(".//*[@value='Search']")).click();						
        Thread.sleep(3000);		
        Assert.assertEquals(driver.getTitle().contains("Facebook - Google Search"), true);				
    }		
}		

Explanation of Code

After assigning priority to each testcases, run the above code using testNG as shown in Video-2 mentioned below.

Here, you can see that test cases are prioritized. Test case having lower priority are executed first i.e. now there is a sequential execution according to priority in the test cases. Hence, all test cases are passing now.

Note the console of eclipse:

Output :

PASSED: openBrowser

PASSED: launchGoogle

PASSED: peformSearchAndClick1stLink

PASSED: FaceBookPageTitleVerification

Number 0 has the highest priority(it’ll be executed first) and the priority goes on based on the given number i.e., 0 has the highest priority than 1. 1 has the highest priority than 2 and so on.

package com.guru.testngannotations;
import org.testng.annotations.Test;

public class TestNG_Priority_Annotations {

    @Test(priority=6)
    public void c_method(){
    System.out.println("I'm in method C");
    }
    @Test(priority=9)
    public void b_method(){
    System.out.println("I'm in method B");
    }
    @Test(priority=1)
    public void a_method(){
    System.out.println("I'm in method A");
    }
    @Test(priority=0)
    public void e_method(){
    System.out.println("I'm in method E");
    }
    @Test(priority=3)
    public void d_method(){
    System.out.println("I'm in method D");
    }

}

Output

I'm in method E 
I'm in method A 
I'm in method D 
I'm in method C 
I'm in method B 

Here we have provided the priorities as 0,1,3,6,9. So, method having 0 as priority is executed first and then method having priority-1 and so on. Here alphabetical order method name won’t be considered as we provided the priorities

Methods with Same Priority:

There may be a chance that methods may contain same priority. In those cases, testng considers the alphabetical order of the method names whose priority is same.

package com.guru.testngannotations;
import org.testng.annotations.Test;

public class TestNG_Priority_Annotations {

    @Test(priority=6)
    public void c_method(){
    System.out.println("I'm in method C");
    }
    @Test(priority=9)
    public void b_method(){
    System.out.println("I'm in method B");
    }
    @Test(priority=6)
    public void a_method(){
    System.out.println("I'm in method A");
    }
    @Test(priority=0)
    public void e_method(){
    System.out.println("I'm in method E");
    }
    @Test(priority=3)
    public void d_method(){
    System.out.println("I'm in method D");
    }

}

Output

I'm in method E 
I'm in method D 
I'm in method A 
I'm in method C 
I'm in method B 

Here ‘e’ and ‘d’ are executed based on their priority values. But the methods ‘a’ and ‘c’ contains the same priority value(6). So, here testng considers the alphabetical order of ‘a’ and ’c’ and executes them accordingly.

Combining both prioritized(having same priority) and non-prioritized methods:

In this case, we’ll cover two cases in one testng class.

  1. Methods having same priority value.
  2. More than one non-prioritized methods.
package com.guru.testngannotations;

import org.testng.annotations.Test;

public class TestNG_Priority_Annotations {

	@Test()
	public void c_method(){
		System.out.println("I'm in method C");
	}
	@Test()
	public void b_method(){
		System.out.println("I'm in method B");
	}
	@Test(priority=6)
	public void a_method(){
		System.out.println("I'm in method A");
	}
	@Test(priority=0)
	public void e_method(){
		System.out.println("I'm in method E");
	}
	@Test(priority=6)
	public void d_method(){
		System.out.println("I'm in method D");
	}
}

Output:

I'm in method B 
I'm in method C 
I'm in method E 
I'm in method A 
I'm in method D 
PASSED: b_method 
PASSED: c_method 
PASSED: e_method 
PASSED: a_method 
PASSED: d_method

Explanation:

First preference: Non-prioritized methods: ‘c’ and ‘b’: Based on alphabetical order ‘b’ was executed first and then ‘c’.

Second preference: Prioritized methods: ‘a’, ‘e’ and ‘d’: ‘e’ was executed first as it was having highest priority(0). As the priority of ‘a’ and ‘d’ methods were same, testng considered the alphabetical order of their methods names. So, between them, ‘a’ was executed first and then ‘d’.

Case-sensitive in TestNG

Just for your information there is a standard syntax for defining priority in testNG i.e. @Test (priority=4), suppose you are defining it in some other syntax say @Test (PRIORITY=1) then your IDE will show it as a compilation error. Refer image below:

TestNG Priority in Test Cases

Conclusion:

As you have seen that if there is a requirement to run a set of test-case in specific sequence then it can be easily done using Priority using testNG as a run tool.

This tutorial is made possible due to contributions of Ramandeep Singh and Rama Krishna Gadde

 

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